The Name Set Your Heart Ablaze in Chinese/Japanese on a Personalized Wall Scroll.

Click the "Customize" button next to your name below to start your personalized set your heart ablaze calligraphy artwork...


  1. Set your heart ablaze

  2. Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind

  3. Realize Your Ambitions / Embrace Your Ambition

  4. Forever In My Heart

  5. Heart and Soul

  6. Soul Mates at Heart

  7. Home is where the heart is

  8. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

  9. Lion Heart

10. Follow Your Heart

11. Loving Heart / One’s Love

12. Mind Your Own Business

13. Never Forget Your First Resolution

14. Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart

15. Pursue Your Dreams

16. Pursuit of Happiness

17. Sisters at Heart

18. Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart

19. With all the strength of your heart

20. Optimism / Happy With Your Fate

21. Alone with only your shadow for company

22. Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit

23. You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

24. Mind of the Beginner

25. Benevolent Heart

26. If you cannot bite, do not show your teeth

27. Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind

28. Brave Heart

29. Broken Hearted

30. Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

31. Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha

32. Caring

33. Chastity / Pure Heart

34. Compassionate Heart / Benevolent Heart

35. Confidence / Faithful Heart

36. Determination

37. Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused

38. Devotion to your Profession / Career

39. Enthusiasm / Warm-Hearted

40. Learning is Eternal

41. Keep Your Feet on the Ground

42. Forever In My Heart

43. Always in My Heart

44. Forever In My Heart

45. Good Heart

46. Heart and Soul

47. Holding Flowers with Subtle Smile

48. Heart / Mind / Spirit

49. Heart Sutra

50. Heart Sutra Mantra

51. Heart Sutra Title

52. Home is where the heart is

53. Immovable Mind

54. Independent Spirit / Independent Heart

55. Inner Heart / Inner Soul

56. Inner Peace

57. Iron Heart

58. Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai

59. Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu

60. Isshin Ryu Karate Do

61. Karma

62. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose

63. Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open

64. Learn From Your Predecessors

65. Lingering Mind

66. Lion Heart

67. Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, Gold Turns a Heart Black

68. Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

69. Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too

70. Loving Heart / Compassion

71. Mind Body Spirit

72. Mind Your Own Business

73. Mind Like Water

74. Morality of Mind

75. No Mind / Mushin

76. One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul

77. An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

78. The Pain of Separation from Your Loves

79. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

80. Peaceful Heart

81. Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind

82. Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

83. Realize Your Ambitions / Ride on the Crest of Success

84. Pure Heart

85. Pursue Your Dreams

86. Pursuit of Happiness

87. If you love your child, send them out into the world

88. Sincerity and Devotion

89. Sincere Heart

90. Respectful Heart

91. Spirit

92. Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

93. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

94. Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children

95. Tao / Dao of the Heart / Soul

96. Thinking Heart

97. Tiger Heart

98. True Heart

99. Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart

100. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

101. Whole Heart

102. Stay Strong / Iron Will

103. Work Together with One Heart

104. Heart of Judo

105. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

106. You are Always in My Heart

107. Heart of a Warrior

108. Choose Your Own Destiny

109. I am the Master of My Destiny

110. Zen Heart / Zen Mind

111. The two most important days in your life...

112. Heart of Aikido

113. Merciful Heart / The Light from a Buddha Mind

114. Realize Your Dreams


Set your heart ablaze

kokoro o mo ya se
Set your heart ablaze Scroll

心を燃やせ is “Kokoro o Moyase” or “Set your heart ablaze” in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind

utsukushii kokoro
Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Mind Scroll

美しい心 means “beautiful heart” or “beautiful mind,” in Japanese.

The word for “heart” also means “mind” and sometimes “soul” in ancient Asia.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Realize Your Ambitions / Embrace Your Ambition

taishi wo Idaku
Realize Your Ambitions / Embrace Your Ambition Scroll

大志を抱く is a Japanese proverb that suggests you should embrace, pursue, and realize your ambitions.

The first part means ambitions or aspirations.

The last part means to embrace or to hold in your arms.

Here's the character breakdown:
大志 (taishi) ambition; aspiration.
を (o) particle
抱く (idaku) to embrace; to hold in the arms (e.g. a baby); to hug; to harbor/harbour; to bear (e.g., a grudge); to entertain (e.g., suspicion); to sleep with; to sit on eggs.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forever In My Heart

i tsu ma de mo watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Forever In My Heart Scroll

いつまでも私の心の中に means “forever in my heart” or “always in my heart” in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forever In My Heart

ei en ni watashi no kokoro no naka ni
Forever In My Heart Scroll

永遠に私の心の中に means “forever in my heart” or “always in my heart” in Japanese.

The character breakdown:
永遠 (eien) eternity; perpetuity; immortality; permanence.
に (ni) indicates the location of a person or thing.
私の (watashi no) my; mine.
心の中 (kokoro no naka) the middle of one's mind; the midst of one's heart.
に (ni) indicates the location of a person or thing (makes this “in” the middle of one's heart).


Note: There’s more than one way to say "Forever in My Heart" in Japanese, so you’ll find another version in our database. This is the very verbose version.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Heart and Soul

shin kon
Heart and Soul Scroll

心魂 is “heart and soul” in Japanese Kanji.

The first character means heart (but can also mean mind or soul).

The last character means soul or spirit (spiritual essence).

Soul Mates at Heart

kokoro no han ryo
Soul Mates at Heart Scroll

心の伴侶 is a Japanese-only title for soulmates.

心 means heart, soul, mind, core, or center. In ancient times, the heart was believed to be the mind or center of your soul and being.

の is a possessive article that connects everything here.

伴侶 means mates, companions, partners, and spouses.

This Japanese version of soulmates is about two partners, coupled or joined by their hearts.

Home is where the heart is

ie to wa kokoro ga aru basho da
Home is where the heart is Scroll

家とは心がある場所だ is, “Home is where the heart is,” in Japanese.

Most Japanese will take this to mean:
If you are with the person or at the place you love most, it becomes your true home.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

teki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles Scroll

敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからず is the longer/full Japanese version of this proverb. This means “Know your enemy, know yourself, and you will not fear a hundred battles.”

Others will translate this as “Know thy enemy, know thyself, yields victory in one hundred battles.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

shi shi shin ou
Lion Heart Scroll

獅子心王 is the Japanese version of the nickname for King Richard the First. It means “Lion Heart King.” The full title is “リチャード獅子心王” in Japanese, or “Richard Lion Heart King.”

If you want a special version of this or a related Lion Heart title, just contact me.

Follow Your Heart

kimochi ni shitagau
Follow Your Heart Scroll

気持ちに従う is a Japanese phrase that means follow your heart.

The first part of this Japanese proverb means feeling, sensation, or mood.

The second part suggests the following, abiding by, or listening to this inner feeling.

In this context, you could say it means your heart, as the whole proverb suggests that you follow the feelings that you have inside.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Loving Heart / One’s Love

koi gokoro
Loving Heart / One’s Love Scroll

戀心 literally means “loving heart.” It can also be translated as “one's love” or “awakening of love.”

戀心 is used exclusively for love between boyfriends and girlfriends or husband and wife.

Breaking down the meaning of each Kanji, the first means love, affection, or tender passion. The second Kanji means heart, mind, or soul (most will read it as the heart).


See Also:  Compassion | Love

Mind Your Own Business

yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Scroll

余計なお世話 suggests that you do not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Never Forget Your First Resolution

Never Lose Your Beginner's Spirit

sho shin wasu ru be ka ra zu
Never Forget Your First Resolution Scroll

初心忘るべからず is an old Japanese proverb that suggests you try to never forget the enthusiasm you had as a child when you try new things (or even face the day-to-day). Basically, avoid having the mundane attitude that many people get with age.

You'll find this Japanese proverb translated in a few different ways. Here are some of them:
Don't forget your first resolution.
Never forget your childlike enthusiasm.
Forget not the beginner's mind.
Try never to lose your initial enthusiasm (freshness of attitude).


Note: This is sometimes written as 初心忘る可からず. The one shown above is used about 10x more often. There’s only one character difference between the two versions.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart

zì zūn xīn
ji son shin
Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart Scroll

自尊心 is a Japanese and Korean word that means “pride” or “self-respect.”

The first Kanji/Hanja means oneself. The second can mean revered, valuable, precious, noble, or exalted. And the last Kanji/Hanja means heart, mind, and/or spirit.


While these characters make sense and hold the same general meaning in Chinese, this is not a normal Chinese word. This selection should only be used if your audience is Japanese or Korean.


See Also:  Respect | Pride | Self-Reliance | Self-Control | Self-Discipline

Pursue Your Dreams

yume wo oi tsudukeru
Pursue Your Dreams Scroll

夢を追い続ける is the Japanese way to express “pursue your dreams,” “follow your dreams,” or “chase your dreams.”

If you have dreams that you want to pursue and make true, this is the phrase for you.

The first character is “dream” or “dreams.” The rest of the characters establish the idea of chasing or pursuing.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

Pursuit of Happiness

koufuku o motome te
Pursuit of Happiness Scroll

幸福を求めて is “Pursuit of Happiness” or “In Search of Happiness” in Japanese.

Here's how the characters break down:
幸福 (koufuku) happiness; blessedness; joy; well-being.
を (o) particle
求め (motome) to want; to seek; to pursue; to request
て (te) particle


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Follow Your Dreams

Sisters at Heart

The love between sisters

kokoro no shi mai
Sisters at Heart Scroll

心の姉妹 is “heart of sisters,” “soul sisters,” or “sisters of the heart.”

This can be used for actual sisters to celebrate the heartfelt love they feel.

It can even be used by two women who feel a connection as if they are sisters.

Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart

ki no tsuyo i
Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart  Scroll

気の強い means strong-willed or strong of heart in Japanese.

Here's the character breakdown of this Japanese title:
気 (ki) spirit; mind; heart; nature; motivation; intention; feelings; essence.
の (no) possessive particle.
強い (tsuyoi) strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

With all the strength of your heart

omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart Scroll

思い切り can be translated as “with all one's strength,” “with all one's heart,” “to the limits of your heart,” or “to the end of your heart/emotions.”

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Optimism / Happy With Your Fate

lè tiān
raku ten
Optimism / Happy With Your Fate Scroll

樂天 is about being optimistic and also making the best of whatever life throws at you.

This is hard to define. One dictionary defines this as “acceptance of fate and happy about it.” There is one English word equivalent, which is sanguinity or sanguinary.

You can also say that this means “Be happy with whatever Heaven provides,” or “Find happiness in whatever fate Heaven bestows upon you.” 樂天 suggests being an optimist in life.

Note: This is sometimes a given name in China.


楽 Please note that Japanese tend to write the first character in a slightly-different form (as seen to the right). Let us know if you have a preference when you place your order.

Alone with only your shadow for company

qióng qióng jié lì xíng yǐng xiāng diào
Alone with only your shadow for company Scroll

煢煢孑立形影相吊 is a Chinese proverb about the state of being as alone as you possibly can be.

It can be translated as “Alone with only your shadow for comfort/company.”


See Also:  I Miss You

Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit

měi lì de xīn líng
Beautiful Heart / Beautiful Spirit Scroll

美麗的心靈 means a beautiful heart, a beautiful mind, or a beautiful spirit in Chinese.

You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes Scroll

Any woman with affection for Asian art will love a gift of this Chinese proverb calligraphy on a wall scroll.

She will melt in your arms as you tell her the meaning of these characters.

Contained in this phrase is a reference to the most beautiful woman in Chinese history. Her name was Xi Shi, and she was known to have good looks that need not have fine robes or makeup. Her charms were so powerful that she brought down an entire kingdom (in a successful effort to bring honor and pride back to her people).

情人眼里出西施 is a great way to express that the woman in your life is your one love.

Mind of the Beginner

Shoshin

chū xīn
sho shin
Mind of the Beginner Scroll

初心 is often translated in Japanese as “beginner's mind” or “beginner's spirit.”

In Chinese, the dictionary definition is “one's original intention.”

The first character means first, initial, primary, junior, beginning, or basic.

The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

初心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo) and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The state of shoshin is that of a beginners mind. It is a state of awareness that always remains fully conscious, aware, and prepared to see things for the first time. The attitude of shoshin is essential to continued learning.

Benevolent Heart

ji hi no kokoro
Benevolent Heart Scroll

慈悲の心 means benevolent heart, compassionate heart, or merciful heart in Japanese.

This is a Japanese-only phrase and should be ordered from our Japanese master calligrapher. This is because the third character is unique Hiragana.

Chances are you are into Inuyasha and are seeking the title of chapter 471 which is often translated as “Merciful Heart.”


See Also:  Love | Altruism

If you cannot bite, do not show your teeth

If you cannot fight, don't start one

bù néng yǎo rén jiù bié zī yá
If you cannot bite, do not show your teeth Scroll

不能咬人就别龇牙 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as: [if you] can't bite people, don't bare [your] teeth.

Figuratively, this means: Don't show your anger if you can't do anything about the situation.

Some will also say this means “Don't start a fight that you cannot win.” Others will say it means that you must be willing to back up your words (perhaps with your fists).

Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind

mào dì zhì duō
boujiishitta
Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind Scroll

冒地質多 is a Chinese and Japanese way to write Bodhicitta.

冒地質多 is often translated as “the enlightened mind” or “enlightened heart.”

This title is strictly Buddhist and won't make sense to Chinese or Japanese people who do not have an expansive background in Buddhist terms, concepts, and scripture.

yǒng gǎn de xīn
Brave Heart Scroll

勇敢的心 is the title “Braveheart,” as in the movie starring Mel Gibson.

The character meanings break down this way:
勇敢 brave.
的 possessive particle.
心 heart/mind.

Broken Hearted

shī liàn
shitsuren
Broken Hearted Scroll

In Chinese, this can mean losing one's love; to breaking up (in a romantic relationship); to feel jilted.

In Japanese Kanji, this means disappointing love, broken heart, unrequited love, or being lovelorn.

失戀 is also valid in old Korean Hanja, which means unrequited love, unreturned love, a disappointment in love, or a broken heart.

Note: In modern Japan, they will tend to write the more simple 失恋 form instead of 失戀. If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect the more simple modern version to be written (unless you give us instructions to use the older or more traditional version).

Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism Scroll

人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神 is known as the Triple Truth of Buddhism in Japanese.

The Buddha ordered that all should know this triple truth...
A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things that renew humanity.

That is the English translation most commonly used for this Japanese Buddhist phrase. You might have seen this on a coffee cup or tee shirt.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha

fó xīn
busshin
Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha Scroll

佛心 means the Buddha's mind, Buddha-heart, or the spiritually enlightened heart/mind.

The Buddha Heart is detached from good and evil and other such constructs. The Buddha Heart has mercy, compassion, and loving-kindness for all sentient life, the good, the wicked, and all in between.

The heart and mind (心) are the same concepts in the ancient Orient, so you can use heart and mind interchangeably in this context.

guān xīn
Caring Scroll

關心 means caring in Chinese.

Caring is giving love and attention to people and things that matter to you and anyone who needs help. When you care about people, you help them. You do a careful job, giving your very best effort. You treat people and things gently and respectfully. Caring makes the world a safer place.

Note: 關心 is also a word in Korean Hanja, but in Korean, it means taking interest or concern. In Korean, it's still a good word, but it doesn't quite have the “caring for a person” meaning that it does in Chinese.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism

Chastity / Pure Heart

Also: Clean / Innocent / Pure

chún jié
jun ketsu
Chastity / Pure Heart Scroll

純潔 is associated with “chastity” but with the direct meaning of clean, innocent, and pure.

If you were expressing the idea of a “pure heart” in Chinese, while not literal, this would be the word you would use.

In Japanese, this word is sometimes used to express purity.

In Korean, it describes purity, chastity, virginity, and innocence (basically the same as the Chinese definition).

Compassionate Heart / Benevolent Heart

cí xīn
jishin
Compassionate Heart / Benevolent Heart Scroll

慈心 means “Compassionate Heart” or “Benevolent Heart.”

It's used in day-to-day speech to refer to someone who has the traits of benevolence, mercy, and compassion for their fellow humans.

This title is also used in Buddhism with the same profound meaning.

Confidence / Faithful Heart

xìn xīn
shin jin
Confidence / Faithful Heart Scroll

信心 is a Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word that means confidence, faith, or belief in somebody or something.

The first character means faith, and the second can mean heart or soul. Therefore, you could say this means “faithful heart” or “faithful soul.”

In Korean especially, this word has a religious connotation.

In the old Japanese Buddhist context, this was a word for citta-prasāda (clear or pure heart-mind).
In modern Japan (when read by non-Buddhists), this word is usually understood as “faith,” “belief,” or “devotion.”


See Also:  Self-Confidence

Determination

jué xīn
kesshin
Determination Scroll

決心 is a Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word that holds the dictionary definition of determination but literally means determined heart.

The first character means to determine or determined.

The second character means heart, mind, or soul, so you can imagine that this form of determination partially means putting your heart into something. It can also be translated as resolve, resolution, or decision (as in a decision made and followed).


See Also:  Devotion | Tenacious | Passion | Dedication | Will-Power

Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused

zhuān xīn
sen shin
Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused Scroll

專心 makes a word that means “paying attention with your heart.”

It's often translated as “dedication,” as in “be absorbed in” or “concentrate one's efforts.” It's also used to mean “with the single mind,” “whole-heartedly,” “paying attention,” “undivided attention,” “concentration (-ed),” “engrossed,” “devotionally (listening/watching),” and/or “attentive.”

The first character means “for a particular person, occasion, or purpose,” “focused on one single thing,” “concentrated,” and sometimes, “special.”

The second character means “heart” or “mind” by itself.

My favorite translation, which comes from the Oxford Advanced Chinese/English Dictionary, is, “wholehearted devotion.”

If it seems like the meaning of this word is quite open, you are correct. The context in which the word is used matters a lot. It can mean different things depending on how you use it. This makes it kind of nice as you can decide what this means to you (within some limits). This is always positive in meaning, so even if a Chinese person reads it differently than you, it will still have a good meaning.


専In Japanese, they tend to use a variation of the second character which has one less stroke. If you want your calligraphy written this Japanese form, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note: Japanese and Chinese people will recognize either form.


See Also:  Faith | Devotion

Devotion to your Profession / Career

cóng shì
jyuu ji
Devotion to your Profession / Career Scroll

從事/従事 is often used to describe the devotion someone has to their profession - However, it can just mean career, depending on context.

We don't highly recommend this selection for a wall scroll.

In more simple terms, this word also means undertake / to deal with / to handle / to do. It does not have to refer to a career issue, as it could be used to encourage someone that is beginning their university studies etc.

This kind of makes sense in Japanese, however, there is a slight deviation in the way they write the first Kanji in Japanese.


Japanese for Devotion to ProfessionPlease note that Japanese use an alternate version of the first character. Click on the character to the right if you want the Japanese version of this two-character Devotion-to-your-Profession calligraphy.

Enthusiasm / Warm-Hearted

rè xīn
nesshin
Enthusiasm / Warm-Hearted Scroll

熱心 literally means “warm-hearted” (can also mean warm-spirited or warm-souled).

This is one of a few ways to say Enthusiasm in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

熱心 is also used to express the ideas of earnestness or eagerness.

Can mean “zeal” in Japanese.

Learning is Eternal

xué wú zhǐ jìng
Learning is Eternal Scroll

This Chinese philosophy tells of how we continue to learn throughout our lives.

This proverb can be translated in a few ways such as “Study has no end,” “Knowledge is infinite,” “No end to learning,” “There's always something new to study,” or “You live and learn.”

The deeper meaning: Even when we finish school we are still students of the world gaining more knowledge from our surroundings with each passing day.


See Also:  An Open Book Benefits Your Mind | Wisdom | Learn From Wisdom

Keep Your Feet on the Ground

Be Down-to-Earth

jiǎo tà shí dì
Keep Your Feet on the Ground Scroll

腳踏實地 is a four-character proverb that suggests that you should be practical, realistic, and grounded.

Some translate this as a suggestion to be down-to-earth.

The first character means “feet.”
The second means “step on” or “stand.”
The third means “solid,” “real,” or “true.”
The last character means “ground,” “earth,” or “terra.”

Literally, this means “[keep your] Feet Standing [on] Solid Ground.”

Forever In My Heart

yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn zhōng
Forever In My Heart Scroll

永远在我心中 means “forever in my heart” or “always in my heart” in Chinese.

Always in My Heart

yǒng zhù wǒ xīn
Always in My Heart Scroll

永駐我心 is one of a few ways to write “always in my heart” or “forever in my heart” in Chinese.

The first character means eternal, forever, or always.

The second character means resides, in, or stationed (in the case of troops).

The third character means me, my, or mine.

The last character means heart (but can also mean mind or soul).

Forever In My Heart

yǒng yuǎn zài wǒ xīn
Forever In My Heart Scroll

永遠在我心 means “forever in my heart” or “always in my heart” in Chinese.

This is the shorter, somewhat lyrical version of this phrase.

永遠 forever/eternal
在 at/in/exists
我 me/myself/my
心 heart/mind/soul

Good Heart

A heart of kindness, benevolence, and virtuous intentions

shàn xīn
yoshinaka
Good Heart Scroll

善心 literally reads “Good Heart” but is used to refer to the ideas of kindness, benevolence, philanthropy, virtuous intentions, moral sense, and conscience.

Some will also translate this as the morality of mind (as the character for the heart is often used to mean mind).

In Japanese, this can be the given name Yoshinaka.

Heart and Soul

xīn yǔ líng
Heart and Soul Scroll

This is “heart and soul” in Chinese.

The first character means heart (but can also mean mind or soul).

The middle character is like the English “and.”

The last character means soul, spirit, or spiritual energy.

Holding Flowers with Subtle Smile

An idiom for heart-to-heart communication

niān huá wēi xiào
nenge misho
Holding Flowers with Subtle Smile Scroll

拈華微笑 is a Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Buddhist title that relays the idea of “heart-to-heart communication,” or “thought transference.”

The literal translation is, “holding a flower and subtly smiling,” or “the holding of a flower with a subtle smile.” It is the visual act and emotion that communicates more volume than words can say.

Heart / Mind / Spirit

xīn
kokoro
Heart / Mind / Spirit Scroll

心 would often be translated as “heart.”

However, because it was believed in Chinese culture for thousands of years that your consciousness and thoughts came from the big red organ in the middle of your chest, it also means “mind” or “spirit” and sometimes even “soul.”

In Korean, beyond heart, mind, and spirit, this character can mean moral, nature, mind, affections, intentions, core, and center. In fact, it is used in Chinese to mean “center” as well but only with another character in front of it. For instance, “medical center” or even “shopping center.” Separately and alone, it will not be read with that “center” meaning unless thought of as “the center of your soul.”

Heart Sutra Scroll

This is the Heart Sutra in Chinese as translated by Xuanzang.

The Heart Sutra is often cited as the best-known and most popular of all Buddhist scriptures.


Notes: There are too many characters for this to be done by the economy calligrapher. You must choose a Master Calligrapher.

With this many characters, and the fact that one tiny mistake wipes out hours of work, keep in mind that writing the Heart Sutra is usually a full day of work for a calligrapher. This work and personal energy should be cherished and respected. In other words, the calligrapher is not charging enough money for the value that you are getting here.

Also, you will find that as my server processes 260 characters, the customization process is a bit slow for this title.

Heart Sutra Mantra

jiē dì jiē dì bō luō jiē dì bō luō sēng jiē dì pú tí sà pó hē
Heart Sutra Mantra Scroll

揭諦揭諦波羅揭諦波羅僧揭諦菩提薩婆訶 is the Mantra included within the Heart Sutra.

Heart Sutra Title

bō rě bō luó mì duō xīn jīng
Heart Sutra Title Scroll

般若波羅蜜多心經 is the title of the Heart Sutra.

The Heart Sutra is a popular Buddhist writing that includes a famous mantra.

Home is where the heart is

jiā yóu xīn shēng
Home is where the heart is Scroll

家由心生 is an old Chinese proverb that is roughly equal to the English idiom “Home is where the heart is.”

If you know Chinese, you may recognize the first character as home and the third as the heart.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin

fu dou shin
Immovable Mind Scroll

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo) and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, and idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title defined as “immovable mind” within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese, it would mean “motionless heart,” and in Korean Hanja, “wafting heart” or “floating heart.”

Independent Spirit / Independent Heart

dokuritsushin
Independent Spirit / Independent Heart Scroll

獨立心 means independent spirit or independent heart in Japanese.

The first two characters mean independent or independence. The third character means spirit, heart, or mind.

獨立心 is a Japanese term, although Chinese people could guess the meaning (the characters make sense individually in Chinese but are not often used this way). Also, the first character would be written 獨 in Traditional Chinese versus 独 which is the Simplified Chinese and modern Japanese version.

Inner Heart / Inner Soul

xīn fēi
Inner Heart / Inner Soul Scroll

心扉 is a Chinese title meaning inner heart or soul.

nèi xīn píng jìng
naishin heizyou
Inner Peace Scroll

內心平靜 is a Chinese and Japanese phrase that is a direct translation of the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of “heart,” “innermost being,” or “deep in the/your inner mind.”

The last two characters mean “tranquil” and “serene.”

I have seen this phrase used as “inner peace” for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for “inner peace.”


See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

tiě xīn
tetsu kokoro / tesshin
Iron Heart Scroll

鐵心 can be translated as “iron heart,” “steel core,” or “iron mind” in Chinese and Japanese Kanji.

This is not a common term, but I added it here since so many were looking for “iron heart.” This is almost like saying you are without emotions or feelings - a very stoic person. This is not a Buddhist trait.

Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai

isshin kai
Isshin-Kai / Isshinkai Scroll

一心会 is the Japanese martial arts title “Isshinkai” or “Isshin-Kai.”

It literally means “One Heart Association” or “Single-Heart Club.” This title is often associated with Isshin-Ryu Aikido and Isshin-Ryu Karate-Do. This title is appropriate for the name of a dojo that teaches these styles.

Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu

i sshin ryuu
Isshin-Ryu / Isshinryu Scroll

一心流 is the title for Isshin-Ryu Karate.

The literal meaning is “one heart method.” You could also translate it as “unified hearts methods.” It implies people doing things as if with one heart and mind.
The second Kanji can be defined as the heart, mind, or essence of your being. Clearly, there's a multitude of ways you can define this title in English.


See Also:  Isshin-Kai

Isshin Ryu Karate Do

i sshin ryuu kara te dou
Isshin Ryu Karate Do Scroll

一心流空手道 is the full title for Isshin-Ryu Karate-Do.

The literal meaning is “one heart method empty hand way.”

There are other ways to translate this, but if you are looking for this title, you already know that.

This would make a great wall scroll for your dojo or private studio if you study this form of Japanese (technically from Okinawa) Karate.

Because this is a specifically-Japanese title, I strongly recommend that you select our Japanese Master Calligrapher to create this artwork.

Karma (of your past lives)

sù yè
shukugou
Karma (of your past lives) Scroll

宿業 is the Buddhist concept of Past Karma. Simply put, it's the sum of all the good and bad from all previous lives (perhaps earlier in your current life). This term is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist faith (you'll have a tough time finding a non-Buddhist Asian person that knows this word).

Other ways to translate this are “The karma of previous existence,” “The karma remaining from prior existences,” or simply “Former karma.”


See Also:  Buddhism

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose

zhí bǐ zhí jī bǎi zhàn bú dài
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and You Cannot Lose Scroll

知彼知己百戰不殆 is from Sun Tzu's (Sunzi's) Art of War. It means that if you know and understand the enemy, you also know yourself, and thus with this complete understanding, you cannot lose.

This proverb is often somewhat directly translated as “Know the enemy and know yourself, and you can fight a hundred battles without defeat.”

It can also be translated as “If you know both yourself and your enemy, you can come out of hundreds of battles without danger,” or “Know your enemy, know yourself, and your victory will not be threatened.”

Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open

àn dǎ hú li míng dǎ láng
Hunt Foxes with Stealth, Hunt Wolves in the Open Scroll

闇打狐狸明打狼 is a Chinese proverb that translates as: Hunt foxes stealthily, [and] hunt wolves openly [just as they do].

Figuratively, this means:
Different opponents require different appropriate strategies.

This is a suggestion that you should know your enemy and know that each enemy is different, therefore requires a specialized approach (attack).


See Also:  Art of War Military

Learn From Your Predecessors

When the cart in front overturns, be cautious with your own

qián chē zhī fù hòu chē zhī jiàn
Learn From Your Predecessors Scroll

前車之覆后車之鑒 is a Chinese proverb that suggests looking at the circumstances and toils of those you proceeded before you and learning from their experience.

This more literally means “the cart in front overturns, a warning to the following cart.”

This is figuratively translated as “draw a lesson from the failure of one's predecessor,” “learn from past mistakes,” or compared to the English idiom, “once bitten twice shy.”

Other more-direct translations:
Make the overturning of the chariot in front a warning for the chariot behind.
Learn caution through an unpleasant experience.
The wrecked coach in front should be a warning.
The overturned cart in front serves as a warning to the carts behind.

Lingering Mind

Zanshin

cán xīn
zan shin
Lingering Mind Scroll

First off, 殘心 should only be used in the context of Japanese martial arts. In Chinese, it's a rather sad title (like a broken heart). In Chinese, the first character alone means destroyed, spoiled, ruined, injured, cruel, oppressive, savage, incomplete, or disabled. However, in Japanese, it's remainder, leftover, balance, or lingering.
The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence in both languages.

殘心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo) and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The spirit of zanshin is the state of the remaining or lingering spirit. It is often described as a sustained and heightened state of awareness and mental follow-through. However, true zanshin is a state of focus or concentration before, during, and after the execution of a technique, where a link or connection between uke and nage is preserved. Zanshin is the state of mind that allows us to stay spiritually connected, not only to a single attacker but to multiple attackers and even an entire context; a space, a time, an event.


残In modern Japan (and Simplified Chinese), they use a different version of the first character, as seen to the right. Click on this character to the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version of lingering mind / zanshin.

shī xīn
Lion Heart Scroll

獅心 is “Lion Heart” in Chinese.

The most famous use of this title would be “Richard the Lionheart,” also known as King Richard I of England who lived 1189-1199 A.D.

Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, Gold Turns a Heart Black

bái jiǔ hóng rén miàn huáng jīn hēi shì xīn
Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, Gold Turns a Heart Black Scroll

白酒紅人面黃金黑世心 literally says: [Just as] white liquor makes people's faces turn red, [So] yellow gold makes people's hearts turn black.

This is a warning about the nature of greed. The suggestion is that one who lusts for gold and riches will eventually have a black heart (or become a heartless greedy bastard). As a wall scroll, this is a reminder and warning to keep yourself from following the greedy path.

Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

suí xīn ér xíng
Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart Scroll

隨心而行 is the closest way to express this idea in Chinese. Literally translated, this phrase means “Allow your heart to dictate your behavior” or “Let your heart guide your conduct” in Chinese. You could also translate this as “follow your heart.” Or, with a bit of imagination, it could mean: “let your spirit be your guide.”

Note that in some cases, “heart” can mean “mind,” “soul” or even “spirit” in Chinese. In ancient China, it was thought that the big pumping organ in your chest was where your thoughts came from, or where your soul resides.
Ancient western thought followed a similar belief. Thus phrases like “I love you with all my heart” and “I give you my whole heart.”

Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too

ài zài xīn lǐ hèn zài miàn pì
Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too Scroll

爱在心里狠在面皮 literally translates as “Love [your] children in [your] heart, [but] be stern [with them] in [your] manner.”

This is a little like saying “Love your child but don't spare the switch.”

Loving Heart / Compassion

ài xīn
Loving Heart / Compassion Scroll

愛心 literally means “loving heart.” It can also be translated as “compassion.”

In Chinese, it carries more of a compassionate meaning.

愛心 is rarely used in Japanese anymore, so best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Compassion | Love

Mind Body Spirit

shēn xīn líng
mi shin rei
Mind Body Spirit Scroll

身心靈 is probably the best way to express the idea of “Body, Mind, and Spirit” in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word “heart” here because, for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings, and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say “warm-hearted” or “I love you with all of my heart.” In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is “body, heart & spirit,” which could also be interpreted as “body, mind & soul.”

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply “feels” like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we must be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Mind Your Own Business

bù gān jǐ shì bù zhāng kǒu yī wèn yáo tóu sān bù zhī
Mind Your Own Business Scroll

不干己事不张口一问摇头三不知 literally translates as [About] matters [that] don't concern [you], do not open [your] mouth, [and] when questioned, always shake [your] head “No.”

Figuratively, this means: It is best to remain reticent about other people's affairs and to refuse to make any comment on matters that don't concern you.

Mind Like Water

Mizu No Kokoro

mizu no kokoro
Mind Like Water Scroll

水の心 is the Japanese Buddhist and martial arts phrase, “Mizu no Kokoro,” which means “mind like water” or “heart of water.”

The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects its surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

Morality of Mind

xīn dé
Morality of Mind Scroll

The idea of 心德 or “morality of mind” goes along with 行德 or “wu de” (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of your heart or mind.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This can also be translated as “morality of heart,” “virtue of heart,” or “virtue of the mind.”

Since ancient times in Asia, the idea of your mind (where your soul resides and your thought originates) has been associated with the heart. Just as in western culture, where we say “it comes from the heart” or “heartfelt emotions,” there is a belief that your heart and mind are one and the same (medical science now begs to differ).


See Also:  Morality of Deed | Martial Morality

No Mind / Mushin

wú xīn
mu shin
No Mind / Mushin Scroll

In Japanese, 無心 means innocent or without knowledge of good and evil. It literally means “without mind.”

無心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo) and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: “No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge.” The original term was “mushin no shin,” meaning “mind of no mind.” It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase “Mizu no Kokoro,” which means “mind like water.” The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects its surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-mindedness. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul

yī shì dài
isshin
One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul Scroll

一心 literally reads as “one heart” in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Colloquially or figuratively, it means: wholeheartedly; heart and soul; of one mind; wholeheartedness; one's whole heart; with the whole mind or heart; one mind in heart.
I'm not kidding, all of those came right from the dictionary for this one title. In Buddhism, this can refer to the bhūtatathatā, or the whole of things; the universe as one mind, or a spiritual unity.

In Japanese, this can be the female given name, Hitomi.

An Open Book Benefits Your Mind

kāi juàn yǒu yì
An Open Book Benefits Your Mind Scroll

There are several ways to translate this ancient proverb. Translated literally and directly, it says, “Open roll has/yields benefit.”

To understand that, you must know a few things...

First, Chinese characters and language have deeper meanings that often are not spoken but are understood - especially with ancient texts like this. Example: It's understood that the “benefit” referred to in this proverb is to the reader's mind. Just the last character expresses that whole idea.

Second, Chinese proverbs are supposed to make you think and leave a bit of mystery to figure out.

Third, for this proverb, it should be noted that roll = book. When this proverb came about (about two thousand years ago), books were rolls of bamboo slips strung together. The first bound books like the ones we use today did not come about until about a thousand years after this proverb when they invented paper in China.

開卷有益 is a great gift for a bookworm who loves to read and increase their knowledge. Or for any friend that is or wants to be well-read.

Some other translations of this phrase:
Opening a book is profitable
The benefits of education.

The Pain of Separation from Your Loves

ài bié lí kǔ
ai betsu ri ku
The Pain of Separation from Your Loves Scroll

愛別離苦 is a Buddhist term that refers to “the pain of separation from loved ones,” or “the suffering of being separated from those whom one loves.”

If you translate each character separately, you get, “love(s) separated [and] departed [yields] pain.”

The pain character can also be defined as anguish; suffering; distress; anxiety; worry; trouble; difficulty; hardship; bitterness; to suffer; anguish; distress; anxiety; worry; trouble; difficulty; bitterness; unhappiness; or misery.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Scroll

誰言寸草心報得三春暉 is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parents or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is “You Zi Yin” which means “The Traveler's Recite.”

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sunlight which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt that you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Peaceful Heart

jìng xīn
shizugokoro / seishin
Peaceful Heart Scroll

靜心 is how to write “peaceful heart” in Chinese.

The first character means peaceful, calm, and quiet. The second means heart but can also mean mind, soul, or spirit.

Because the word for heart/mind/soul is interchangeable in Chinese, this can also be translated as “a peaceful soul” or “a quiet mind.”

I have also seen this translated as “placid temperament” or “spirit of serenity,” especially in Japanese.


静While they once used the same first character form in Japan, they now use a slightly-simplified version in modern Japan (after WWII). This version is shown to the right, and can be selected for your wall scroll by clicking on that Kanji instead of the button above.

Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind

ān xīn
an shin
Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind Scroll

安心 can be defined as relief, peace of mind, feeling at ease, to be relieved, to set one's mind at rest, and easiness.

安心 is a nice word that encompasses great meanings within just two characters. Some of the other meanings include pacifying, settling the mind, and peace of mind. It's also the idea of feeling a sense of security, safety, and confidence in your state of well-being.

This can be used by everyone, but some consider it to be a Buddhist concept (You'll find it in your Zen dictionary).

Note: Can be romanized as Anshin or Anjin in Japanese.

Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

shě shēng qǔ yì
Better to sacrifice your life than your principles Scroll

捨生取義 is a Chinese proverb that comes from the philosopher Mencius.

It can be translated in a few different ways:
To give up life for righteousness.
To choose honor over life
Better to sacrifice one's life than one's principles.

Realize Your Ambitions / Ride on the Crest of Success

dà jiǎn hóng tú
Realize Your Ambitions / Ride on the Crest of Success Scroll

大展宏圖 is a four-character proverb used in Chinese to mean “realize your ambitions” or “exhibit your ambition and success.”

It's used to talk about someone with great career ambitions. Almost literally, it expresses the idea of someone unfolding a great career like a map or a set of blueprint plans.

Very literally translated, these four characters mean “Great unfolding of a huge map” or “Great exhibition of a colossal plan.”

Pure Heart

Pure and Innocent

chún qíng
jun jou
Pure Heart Scroll

純情 means “Pure Heart” in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

It's used to reflect the ideas of being “pure and innocent.”

Depending on the context in which this title is used, it can relay “self-sacrificing devotion” or, in some cases, “naïveté.”
This would be in the same way we might refer to a young girl giving her lunch money to a beggar on the street. She has a pure and precious heart but perhaps is also a bit naive.

Pursue Your Dreams

zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
Pursue Your Dreams Scroll

追尋夢想 means “pursue your dreams,” “follow your dreams,” or “chase your dreams” in Chinese.

The first two characters mean “to pursue,” “to track down,” or “to search for.”

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

Pursuit of Happiness

zhuī xún xìng fú
Pursuit of Happiness Scroll

追尋幸福 is the best way to translate the English phrase “pursuit of happiness” into Chinese.

The first two characters mean “to pursue,” “to track down,” or “to search for.”

The last two mean happiness, happy, or being blessed.


See Also:  Follow Your Dreams

If you love your child, send them out into the world

kawaii ko ni wa tabi o sa seyo
If you love your child, send them out into the world Scroll

可愛い子には旅をさせよ is a Japanese proverb that means “If you love your children, send them out on a journey into the world.”

This is kind of similar to the western phrase, “Spare the rod and spoil the child.”

More literally, this reads, “Cute child, a journey granted.”
That “granted” could also be understood as “should be initiated.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Sincerity and Devotion

zhì chéng
shisei
Sincerity and Devotion Scroll

至誠 is the idea that you enter into something with the utmost sincerity and fidelity. Ideas such as devotion, honesty, and “one's true heart” are also contained in this word.

至誠 is a universal word as the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja are all identical.

Sincere Heart

xuě xīn
Sincere Heart Scroll

When you take 血心 apart, you find the sum is slightly different than the parts. The first character means blood, and the second means heart. It is important to note that for thousands of years, it was believed that your heart was both your soul and your mind in Asian culture. When you add blood to the heart, it is your whole being - the pure and clean dedication of your whole soul.

Most Chinese dictionaries define this as the sincerity of heart or a MEDICAL TERM!!!
Please think carefully before ordering this selection - it was only added as others have used this for coffee cups and other novelties (though perhaps naively).

Respectful Heart

zūn jìng xīn
son kei shin
Respectful Heart Scroll

尊敬心 means respectful heart in Japanese, Chinese and Korean.

The root is 尊敬 which means respect, honor, reverence, esteem, and/or nobility. Therefore, you can also define this as an honorable heart, reverent heart, noble heart, etc.

In ancient times, it was thought your brain was the heart in your chest. Therefore, 心 or heart can also mean “mind.” Hence, 尊敬心 can also be translated as respectful mind, honorable mind, etc.

You'll see 尊敬心 romanized as Sonkeishin or Sonkeshin from Japanese.

jīng shén
sei shin
Spirit Scroll

精神 is the kind of spirit you have if you perform well in sports or competitions. It is the idea of having a good attitude and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what “spirit” really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart, or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive, and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit, and soul.


See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

jīng shén lì liàng
seishin rikiryou
Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit Scroll

精神力量 is a title that speaks of one's soul or spirit and the capacity or strength that soul possesses.

The first two characters mean mind, heart, spirit, and/or soul.

The last two characters mean strength, capacity, or ability.

Note: Separately, these are two words in Japanese and can be pronounced, but this does not make a natural title in Japanese (best if your audience is Chinese).

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed Scroll

意志堅強 can mean either “strong-hearted,” “strong-willed” or “determination.”

The first two characters can be translated as “will,” “willpower,” “determination,” “volition,” “intention,” or “intent.” But, it should be noted that this first part possesses the element of “heart” in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning “with the whole heart”).

The last two characters mean “strong” or “staunch.”

Chinese word order and grammar are a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children

shì cù rú yīng ér gù kě yǐ yú zhī fù shēn xī shì cù rú ài zǐ gù kě yú zhī jū sǐ
Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children Scroll

視卒如嬰兒故可以與之赴深溪視卒如愛子故可與之俱死 is an entry from the 10th section within the Earth/Terrain chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War.

This is often translated as “Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys. Look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death.”

Tao / Dao of the Heart / Soul

xīn dào
Tao / Dao of the Heart / Soul Scroll

心道 means “The Way of the Heart” or “The Way of the Soul.” The first character means “heart” but can also mean soul, spirit, mind, or your essence. In this case, it is most accurately translated with the heart or soul meaning.

The second character is Dao as in Daoism. Please note, this is the same thing as Tao as in Taoism (just Romanized differently - it's always been the same in Chinese for about 2300 years.

Thinking Heart

zhí duō
chitta
Thinking Heart Scroll

質多 is a Buddhist term that means “the heart considered as the seat of intellect” and “the thinking and reflecting mind.”

hǔ xīn
tora kokoro
Tiger Heart Scroll

虎心 is “Tiger Heart” in Chinese and Japanese.

This can be a name and is also a rare and exotic gourmet dish served on occasion in southern China.

zhēn xīn
mago koro
True Heart Scroll

While 真心 literally reads as “true heart” or “genuine heart,” the understood meaning is sincerity, devotion, sincere, or heartfelt. Some will extend the meaning to be like “true love.” It's the idea of doing something or treating someone with genuine feelings.

真心 is valid and has the same meaning in both Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji.

Note: While not too common, this can be the female given name “Mami” in Japanese.

Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart

wǔ shì xīn
bu shi kokoro
Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart Scroll

武士心 means “Warrior Heart.”

武士心 is more a Japanese title than Chinese, but it is understood in both languages.

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way

yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible Scroll

有志者事竟成 is an old Chinese proverb that has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to doing it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible with a strong mind.


quán xīn
zenshin
Whole Heart Scroll

全心 is a short title that means “with heart and soul” or “one's whole heart.”

It literally reads “whole heart” or “complete mind.”

The first character means all, whole, entire, or complete.

The second character means heart but can also refer to the mind or soul.

Stay Strong / Iron Will

tesshin sekichou
Stay Strong / Iron Will Scroll

鉄心石腸 is a Japanese proverb that suggests you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron.

It's the Japanese way of saying, “stay strong.” This is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means “iron will, stone guts” or “iron heart, rock-hard bowels.”

Work Together with One Heart

qí xīn xié lì
Work Together with One Heart Scroll

齊心協力 is a Chinese proverb that means “to work with a common purpose,” “to make concerted efforts,” “to pull together,” or “to work as one (or as if with one heart).”

Heart of Judo

róu
yawara
Heart of Judo Scroll

This 柔 Kanji literally means flexible, pliable, gentle, or yielding.

柔 is also the first Kanji of the Japanese martial arts titles of Judo and Jujutsu (Jujitsu). In those cases, it's pronounced “ju” in Japanese. However, alone, the classic pronunciation is “yawara.” Some translate this Kanji (in the context of martial arts) as “The Heart of Judo.”

Please note that this just means pliable, gentle, and yielding in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. They do know what Judo and Jujitsu are but if this character is seen alone in China or Korea, people generally will not think of the martial arts context.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history

jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Scroll

盡忠報國 is a proverb that is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as “Serve the country with the utmost loyalty.” More literally, it means “[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country.”

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means “serve the country faithfully” or “die for the country.” Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean “Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country.”

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, or job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

You are Always in My Heart

nǐ yī zhí zài wǒ xīn zhōng
You are Always in My Heart Scroll

你一直在我心中 means “You are always in my heart” in Chinese.

你 = You
一直 = Always
在 = In/At
我 = Me/My
心中 = Heart/Mind

The idea or definition of heart and mind kind of overlap in ancient Chinese, so this can also mean “You are always in my mind.”

Heart of a Warrior

zhàn shì zhī xīn
Heart of a Warrior Scroll

戰士之心 can mean “Heart of a Warrior” or “Heart of a Fighter” in Chinese.

Choose Your Own Destiny

xuǎn zé zì jǐ de mìng yùn
Choose Your Own Destiny Scroll

選擇自己的命運 means “Choose your destiny” or “pick your own fate” in Chinese.

Let's break down the words in this phrase here...
選擇 means to choose, pick, or select.
自己 means oneself or one's own.
的 is a possessive modifier.
命運 means fate or destiny.

I am the Master of My Destiny

wǒ mìng yóu wǒ bù yóu tiān
I am the Master of My Destiny Scroll

我命由我不由天 is often translated as “The one that shapes my destiny will always be myself rather than the God” or “Rather than Heaven, I am the master of my fate.”

Breaking down the words directly:
我命 = My fate/destiny
由我 = depends (on) me
不 = not
由天 dependant (on) Heaven.


See Also:  Choose Your Own Destiny

Zen Heart / Zen Mind

chán xīn
zen shin
Zen Heart / Zen Mind Scroll

禪心 represents an image of your meditation coming from and filling your heart.

The meaning of the first character is “meditation” and the second character is usually defined as “heart” or sometimes “mind.”

There is a two-fold meaning here, as a good meditation session must start with a centered heart or mind. Yet at the same time, meditation serves to cleanse, focus, and center the heart and mind.

The two most important days in your life...

Jinsei de ichiban daijina hi wa futsuka aru. Umaretahi to, naze umareta ka o wakatta hi
The two most important days in your life... Scroll

人生で一番大事な日は二日ある。生まれた日と、なぜ生まれたかを分かった日 is Mark Twain's quote, “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why” in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Heart of Aikido

Aikido no Kokoro

ai ki dou no kokoro
Heart of Aikido Scroll

合気道の心 is often translated as “The Spirit of Aikido,” but it is more directly translated as “Heart of Aikido.”

Merciful Heart / The Light from a Buddha Mind

xīn guāng
shin kou
Merciful Heart / The Light from a Buddha Mind Scroll

心光 can mean the light from a Buddha's mind or “merciful heart.”

This would especially be the light emanating from Amitābha.

Note that the character 心 can mean mind or heart. 光 means light or brightness - but in this context can suggest a glow of mercy or compassion. This can also be a Japanese surname that is romanized as Shinkou or Shinko.

Realize Your Dreams

shí xiàn nǐ de mèng xiǎng
Realize Your Dreams Scroll

實現你的夢想 means “realize your dreams” or “live your dreams” in Chinese.

實現 means to achieve, to implement, to realize, or to bring about.

The characters 你的 effectively mean “your.”

夢想 means to dream, imagine, or have a vision.




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